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Syndicated News Archives - Page 5 of 263 - Ansell Ryan Young

Startup Diary: Why it’s crucial that market demand exists for your startup

This week I’m going to write about the most difficult slide in your entire pitch deck. This particular slide outlines the evidence that you have a real business, by showing that a market demand exists.

Even if you have a real business, with real customers, and real traction, it may not be enough, especially for later rounds of funding.

At the seed stage, which is where we are now, unless you’ve stumbled upon something wonderful, you won’t even have the luxury of real, statistically significant, numbers.

I should emphasise that you need to be very careful here.

I consider seed funding to occur mostly at the pre-revenue stage. You might have some custom consulting engagements, but that’s not really revenue that proves the model.

All you’ve done is prove the need in a particular case. Some investors might want you to have shown some traction on your core business model before raising a seed round.

This is possible if you decide to monetise your Minimum Viable Product (MVP).

Thus, you’ll need to make a strategy decision long before you start putting together a pitch deck.
Either you’re going to use focused pilot projects as trials to understand your customers and generate some market validation, or you’ll open the shop doors as soon as you have anything on the shelf, and try to sell as soon as possible.

Which strategy you choose is determined by who pays for your product.

We are talking about Business-to-Business Software-as-a-Service in this diary, as that’s what Voxgig is. I don’t pretend to know much about building consumer businesses.

If you are targeting small businesses, or freelance professionals, or narrow functions within a business (say, social media automation), then I think it makes more sense to monetise your MVP from the start.

If, like Voxgig, you’re trying to build a cross-functional solution, and a solution that will cross organisation boundaries, then I think it’s better to focus on pilot trials – you really need the deep understanding of the customer pain points that comes with high-touch engagements.

The evidence that you present on your pitch deck to show that there is a growth business is going to be based partly on the results of these different strategies. In the ‘monetise-early’ case, you’re really going to need to have good growth in user registrations and conversions.

You’re going to want to show how your meagre advertising budget, guerrilla marketing, and energetic hustling has delivered good growth with obvious potential for more. You may not be at product-market fit, but you should be providing some utility to your customers, and be able to show it. Think of the early days of companies like Evernote, Github, and Mailchimp.

We’ve chosen the other approach: private trials. That means we don’t have much in the way of actual user numbers. You won’t even be able to register on voxgig.com until January next year.

What you can use are the pilot trials themselves – if you can’t get people to use your stuff for free, there’s no hope.

You should also be in the process, or at least preparing, to turn those pilots into paying customers – they did find your product useful, right?

You must however remain painfully aware that pilots (which you probably found via your network) do not prove your business model at all.

That only comes later when people who’ve never met you visit your website and buy from you (which is just a wonderful rush, by the way). You mention the pilots, they do provide some evidence, but you’ll need more.

The way we’ve addressed this problem is to start our marketing activities long before releasing the product. That’s why we have the newsletter for public speakers and that’s why it was our first ‘product’.

The growth in subscriber numbers is proxy for demand from conference speakers for better ways to collaborate. Our success here has led us to double down on this activity and we’ll be launching a second newsletter for event organisers and a podcast, in a few weeks from now.

This early marketing activity does give us some real evidence that need exists in the market. If you are building a more enterprise-level system, necessarily you’ll be taking longer to get to the point where it can be used at all (all those base-level enterprise features, like groups and permissions, need to be built).

Early marketing activity, and I would count our little search engine MVP as part of this, can both help you understand the market, and show that it exists.

Perhaps now you see why this slide is the most difficult – if you haven’t got the evidence, then you’re reduced to putting ‘lipstick on a pig’. There’s only so much you can do with market research reports.

Unfortunately many technical founders end up in this position, where the system is relatively complete, but there’s still huge market risk – it may not exist at all.

There is nuance here that you should observe: market risk (will anyone buy?) is not the same as product risk (does the product meet the market need?).

Voxgig has higher product risk than market risk at this point in time – have we built the right product for a market that we have strong evidence for?

Our goal in 2019 is to remove this risk by reaching product-market fit.

The strategies that we have chosen in Voxgig are not the only ones you can use to build evidence.

I’ve been very lucky to provide advice to some great startups over the last year, and those founders have used some great approaches.

In one, case, the founder put in many hours participating in the target online communities where they would find their customers, becoming a trusted community leader.

In another case, the founder found a way to service a small focused market using people rather than software, validating the larger market.

In both cases, they were following the maxim of Paul Graham (the founder of the ycombinator startup accelerator): do things that don’t scale.

At first you shouldn’t worry about the technology at all.

First, you should build evidence that a market exists.

And you shouldn’t just do this for investors.

Do it for yourself. You’re investing so much of your own time, and money (in saving and lost wages), that you also, as founder, need good evidence that you have a business.

(Newsletter update: 3,939 subscribers, and an open rate of 13pc. We are back on track with improved processes and measurement. Good incident reports lead to great outcomes.)

Article Source: http://tinyurl.com/kbwqb42

Comment: Economic data and sentiment are becoming detached

SMEs are the engine of the Irish economy. They make a major contribution to economic development and employment. Their performance is very closely linked with overall economic health, including to consumer sentiment – because people’s confidence in their own finances and purchasing ability influence the performance of SMEs.

Businesses’ confidence is equally important; the more confident business owners and managers are, the greater the prospects for their companies, for overall employment and incomes. Confident firms are more likely to make investment and purchasing decisions.

So how confident are Irish SMEs?

The SME Monitor shows evidence that not all is as robust as the indicators might suggest.

The latest BPFI SME Market Monitor assesses the economic environment in which SMEs are operating. The Monitor concludes that the economic environment remains considerably positive.

There has been continued improvement in the labour market, unemployment has almost halved in three years to reach 5.4pc in September and the underlying growth in the economy, as measured by Modified Domestic Demand, is a healthy 6.5pc.

Moreover, while SMEs continue to reduce their debt, the total new lending to Irish SMEs has expanded on an annual basis in each of the three quarters to the middle of this year.

However, the annual growth has moderated – from 16.5pc in the last three months of 2017 to 6.3pc in the second quarter of this year. The latest Credit Demand Survey from the Department of Finance reported that only 26pc of SMEs sought bank finance, while 89pc cited a lack of need as the reason they did not access credit. This is at odds with an economy which is expected to be the fastest growing in the EU for the fifth consecutive year.

The key area of concern is consumer sentiment. The latest ESRI/KBC Consumer Sentiment Index for September fell sharply for two months in a row, to its lowest level since December 2016.

Consumers are feeling detached from the strong macro data and are increasingly nervous about their own financial situation, as they cope with rising housing and energy costs. They are also worried about external factors, notably Brexit.

Who is thinking about how Brexit will impact the consumer?

While the economic environment is strongly positive, there are undoubtedly a number of challenges for SMEs, not least Brexit.

There is no clarity on what will happen at the end of March and no prospect of any clarity any time soon.

Yet we know that a number of sectors have already been heavily impacted by exchange rate developments since Brexit, notably the agri-food and beverage, traditional manufacturing and retail and wholesale sectors.

The prospects of tariffs and/or onerous regulatory arrangements after Brexit, whatever the ultimate deal is, are likely to give rise to many challenges for SMEs, particularly those in the most vulnerable counties most dependent on the sectors which are most at risk.

Article Source: http://tinyurl.com/kbwqb42

US Reit gets go-ahead for €400m Dublin data centre

A MAJOR stock market-listed US real estate investment trust, CyrusOne, has been granted planning permission for a massive €400m data centre in Dublin.

It will be the Dallas-based company’s first data centre project in Ireland and will significantly boost its global data centre footprint.

Nasdaq-listed CyrusOne, with a $6.6bn (€7.5bn) market capitalisation, currently has more than 40 data centres across the United States, Germany, the UK and Asia.

The planned Dublin data centre will extend over 32,419 sq m (349,000 sq ft) and be separated into two adjoining blocks. It will represent about an 8pc increase in CyrusOne’s current 400,000 sq m of total rentable data centre space.

The data centre will be built at the Grange Castle business park in the capital, where Microsoft and Google already have similar large-scale facilities.

The project is expected to involve up to 250 building personnel during its roughly 18-month construction period.

The Reit is planning to build the two-storey data centre and associated office block on a 9.2-hectare site.

That includes a 6.3-hectare site owned by South Dublin County Council within the Grange Castle Business Park, and an adjoining 2.9 hectares that form the plots of three residential properties that will be demolished to make way for the development.

The project will also include the construction of a new electricity substation and the installation of 32 back-up generators.

The data centre is expected to consume 56.5MW of power when operational.

CyrusOne joins a data centre surge in Ireland that has seen giants such as Amazon, Microsoft, Google and Facebook invest billions of euro in such facilities here in the past number of years.

CyrusOne was founded in 2001 and is the third-largest data centre provider in the United States.

CEO Gary Wojtaszek told CNBC this week that the data-centre industry continues to deliver robust growth.

“Our customers, which are predominantly Fortune 1,000 customers, are deployed everywhere globally,” he said. “So if you really want to be helpful to the customers’ needs, you have to have a global platform and if you don’t you’re really in an inferior position.

“We look at all the success we’ve had in the States over the last decade and we feel really comfortable that we’ll be able to export that same success internationally,” he added

Article Source: http://tinyurl.com/kbwqb42

Everything, including CAP, will be hit if there is a hard Brexit

Everything will be hit, including CAP, if there is a hard Brexit, RTE Europe Editor Tony Connelly told a recent Brexit conference.

“The EU budget would be impacted and CAP would come under attack,” Mr Connelly said, adding though, that he was of the view that the Commission didn’t want a radically cut CAP budget because of Brexit – but that was under the scenario that there would be a withdrawal agreement.

“I think everything will be hit if there is a hard Brexit,” he added.

Tariffs, currency fluctuations and corporation tax were among the concerns raised by more than 230 small business owners and interest group representatives at the event this week.

The event held in Loughrea, Co Galway, and organised by Supermac’s, was also addressed by IFA president Joe Healy.

Mr Healy said that some people questioned whether Ireland had allowed itself to become too dependent on the UK as an export market for food.

However he pointed to fact that when Ireland first joined what was then the EEC in 1973, 70pc of agri-exports were going to the UK. Today this figure is around 40pc.

Nonetheless, the agri-food sector is set to be disproportionately impacted by Brexit. Mr Connelly noted that within weeks of the Brexit vote taking place, five mushroom businesses in Ireland went to the wall, due in part to the impact of the fall in the value of sterling.

Article Source: http://tinyurl.com/kbwqb42

Thousands left without welfare payments after system crash causes delay

A European payments system crash left thousands of people without vital payments.

People who receive social-welfare payments, such as child benefit and farm assist, found there were no funds in their accounts yesterday morning.

An industry-wide issue affected European payments across a number of banks.

People whose payments were due to be paid into accounts in Ulster Bank, Permanent TSB, EBS and An Post were left without money.

The issue was resolved later in the day and frantic efforts were made to credit accounts yesterday afternoon.

People who receive their payments over the counter in a post office were not affected.

Among the payments that were affected were disability allowance, the household benefit package, deserted wives payment, working family payment, jobseeker’s payment, injury benefit and farm assist.

However, weekly State pensions payments were not affected.

“The children’s allowance and social welfare payment due to be paid into the bank in the morning were not there, which has left me and my family of six with 33 cent in the bank,” one concerned mother said.

It is just the latest payments glitch to affect consumers. Just weeks ago, Ulster Bank had another payments issue.

A spokesperson for the Department of Social Protection said a bank payments issue affected European payments, which delayed some social welfare payments due to be paid into customer bank accounts.

“The department can confirm that it processed all its payments as usual.”

AIB and Bank of Ireland account holders said they were not affected the payments breakdown.

Later in the day, the Banking and Payments Federation Ireland said that payments processing had recommenced and all customers were due to receive payments to their accounts.

Article Source: http://tinyurl.com/kbwqb42

Dublin Information Sec 2018: Secure your company smartphones to guard against data breaches

A little over a decade ago, the most popular mobile phone in use in businesses was the humble Nokia 6310i, famed for its near indestructibility and a battery life counted in days not hours.

Today, everyone has a powerful computer in their pocket with the capability to connect to the internet, access work and personal emails, to store files and images relating to friends, families, or customers. It will be impossible to do justice to all angles of this challenge in this article.

Article 32 of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) restates some age old principles of information security. However, it is important for organisations of all sizes to have considered how they will prevent unauthorised access to or disclosure of data, how they will respond to such issues, and how they will meet their obligations to notify affected individuals and the Data Protection Commission in the event of a data security breach involving a mobile device.

Enable encryption on your devices and set a pass code

This is “entry-level” security and is the minimum anyone should be doing. Encryption is on by default on iOS devices but needs to be enabled on most Android devices through system settings. Combined with a passcode (and one longer than four digits where possible), you create a barrier to your phone being accessed by third parties. Use of fingerprint readers is increasingly popular, but it does raise challenges in the context of data privacy as it is a biometric identifier.

Check what data is being accessed and where data is being stored.
It is a worthwhile exercise to regularly review the apps you have installed to verify what data they can access from or write to your device. If you find you have apps you simply are not using, it is worth deleting them so their access is revoked.

The proliferation of messaging apps in recent years has resulted in an increase in sharing of images or files through these tools. It’s worth checking where these apps download their photos or files to and, if you don’t want data saved to your device, adjust the settings accordingly.

Update your operating system regularly

Both Apple and Google frequently push out updates. However, Android update roll-outs depend on manufacturers. As of September 3, Fossbytes.com reported that more than 72pc of devices were not running the latest version of Android.

Compare this to iOS which, as of September 19, had 80.5pc of users on version 11 or higher.

Use a VPN

Whether you are using your mobile service provider’s network or public wifi, a VPN client on your phone or mobile device is a useful security precaution to keep your data safe.

This is particularly the case if you are using public wifi or shared wifi networks to keep your data usage down on your bills. There are a range of good VPN clients out there for individuals and organisations. Freedome from F-Secure is one I use personally.

Enable Two Factor Authentication on your accounts

Devices are a gateway into your organisation’s data and increasingly they are being targeted for phishing attacks, as the design of mobile email clients and messaging apps allows for email headers to be hidden and makes spoofed email addresses harder to spot.

The use of SMS and messaging apps as attack vectors make it easier for attackers to “personalise” attacks. According to research by Lookout, mobile phishing attempts have increased 85pc year on year since 2011. Research from security vendor Wandera found the average mobile user was 18 times more likely to encounter a phishing attack then a malware attack and were three times more likely to fall for phishing on mobile than desktop. Two-factor authentication creates an additional layer of security to prevent human fallibility exposing your organisation.

Put in place a device management policy and supporting tools

Be clear with staff what will happen if a device is lost or stolen. This is particularly important where the device is used for both work and personal life. Mobile device management tools can help with enforcing encryption and device locking/wiping policies. More advanced solutions can create a “walled garden” for work apps that can be controlled separately from the rest of the phone. As ever, GDPR and common sense require you to consider what is the appropriate level of security and controls for your organisation’s data.

Staff leaving with data on devices

This is an often overlooked risk with mobile devices but is a very common challenge. Staff (or volunteers in a not-for-profit organisation) need to be aware that the personal data they are given in the course of their role with your organisation is given to them for specific purposes and is not their data to take when they leave.

Unless the data is very clearly given in a personal context, any use of that data by the former staff member or contractor could constitute a breach of Section 144 or Section 145 of the Data Protection Act 2018. In any event, it would constitute a breach under GDPR. Have clear policies and procedures around deletion of data and recovery of data on personal or devices of former staff. In conclusion, treat devices as the small computers they are, and remember they are often a key gateway into your organisation for staff and malicious actors alike.

Article Source: http://tinyurl.com/kbwqb42

Small firms fear Brexit tariffs and CAP budget cuts

Tariffs, currency fluctuations and corporation tax were among the concerns raised by more than 230 small business owners and interest group representatives at a Brexit event yesterday.

The event held in Loughrea, Co Galway, and organised by Supermac’s, was addressed by RTE Europe editor Tony Connelly, and Farmers Association president Joe Healy. Among the concerns aired by those present were the implications for small businesses in the event of a hard Brexit.

One such business owner was Mícheál Quinn, owner of Quinn RV SIP, a vehicle manufacturing company employing just over 100 people in Athenry, Co Galway.

Quinn RV SIP exports as much as 70pc of its products to the UK. Mr Quinn said he feels SMEs are largely being ignored by the Government and Enterprise Ireland.

By attending the event, he hoped to get “some form of clarity” around Brexit, but added that he didn’t think he would. “It is becoming difficult to get straight answers,” he said.

The company has projects scheduled for the UK market next spring, and he told the Irish Independent that a number of key customers in the UK have contacted him for assurance that he will still take on UK-based work “which is comfort to us”. However he remains concerned about the impact of possible tariffs and currency fluctuations on this business.

Another SME owner said that while what Brexit will look like remains unknown, it was “reassuring” to be in a room full of businesses with similar concerns.

Worries were also raised around Ireland’s corporation tax rate. The 12.5pc rate has long been a point of contention among some other European nations.

A member of the audience asked if the rate would now come under pressure at European level, given that Ireland was losing a “huge ally” in Europe once the UK leaves the EU.

“There is always pressure on Ireland to adjust our tax regime and that pressure is always resisted,” Mr Connelly said.

However, Mr Connelly added that for any change to the rate to take place, there would need to be unanimity from EU member states on the matter, and Ireland has a veto on any changes to tax rules.

Mr Healy said that some people questioned whether Ireland had allowed itself to become too dependent on the UK as an export market for food.

However he pointed to fact that when Ireland first joined what was then the EEC in 1973, 70pc of agri-exports were going to the UK. Today this figure is around 40pc.

Nonetheless, the agri-food sector is set to be disproportionately impacted by Brexit. Mr Connelly noted that within weeks of the Brexit vote taking place, five mushroom businesses in Ireland went to the wall, due in part to the impact of the fall in the value of sterling.

Ann Mitchell, a member of Galway IFA, asked whether the budget for Europe’s Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) would by affected under a no-deal scenario between the UK and the EU.

“The EU budget would be impacted and CAP would come under attack,” Mr Connelly said, adding though, that he was of the view that the Commission didn’t want a radically cut CAP budget because of Brexit – but that was under the scenario that there would be a withdrawal agreement. “I think everything will be hit if there is a hard Brexit,” he added.

Mr Healy went on to say that a fear for the IFA is that the UK, post-Brexit, pursue a “cheap food policy… importing food from places like South America”.

Mr McDonagh, CEO of Supermac’s, said that he was hosting the event because Brexit is something “we are all still learning about”.

Article Source: http://tinyurl.com/kbwqb42

Manufacturing growth falls in September

Growth in the Irish manufacturing sector fell slightly in September.

The Irish Manufacturing Purchasers Managers’ Index (PMI) recorded a reading of 56.3 for the month, down from the seven month high of 57.5 reported in August.

Any reading over 50 is deemed growth.

Overall, and the manufacturing sector continued to perform strongly in September, according to the report from IHS Markit.
New orders and output rose sharply again, while firms responded by upping their rate of job creation, with employment in the sector increasing at the fastest pace in seven months.

The rate of input cost inflation remained elevated, encouraging manufacturers to continue raising output prices.

New export business also increased, and at a broadly similar pace to the previous month.

Looking forward and firms remained confident that output will increase over the coming year. Optimism reflected predictions of higher new orders, the launch of new products and higher operating capacity.

“The Irish manufacturing sector continued to buck the recent trend of weakening growth seen in the eurozone, with manufacturing output rising sharply again in September,” Andrew Harker, associate director at IHS Markit, said.

“The main highlight from the latest PMI survey is a sharp pick-up in the rate of job creation, with employment increasing at the fastest pace in seven months as firms responded to higher workloads and looked to expand capacity.”

Article Source: http://tinyurl.com/kbwqb42

Problem Solver: Do I really need to take a startup course to go out on my own after 15 years?

Q Having worked for 15 years for an employer, I am now starting my own business. I am being encouraged to do a startup course, which I feel is unnecessary after my years in business. What do you think?

A You are being given good advice. Most of these courses are run by your Local Enterprise Office and the general feedback I get from anyone who has completed them is very strong.

The fact that you have worked for a long period in industry will assist your business in a very big way and has probably allowed you to develop the business model you are planning to come to market with. You will, however, be dealing with lots of new areas which you have never encountered in the past, like tax, Vat, payroll, and doing your own book-keeping.

Many people who were formerly in industry don’t pay enough attention to these headings and really struggle with them when their business goes live.

Don’t underestimate the practical aspects of running a business which can sometimes be every bit as critical as generating sales and developing marketing programmes.

You will also find as you complete this course, you will be involved with a mix of 10 or 15 other businesses and the networking and knowledge-sharing through these groups can also be phenomenal. I wish you well and would really encourage you to do this course.

Q I am finding it increasingly difficult for my business to stand out in what has become a mature sector that I am trading in. My competitors have caught up with me and I am not sure what to do now

A If you read many of the textbooks about how businesses and sectors evolve, what you are describing happens in most business sectors. The sector starts off with a small number of players who compete and create a competitive advantage over each other. As the decades progress, they improve their offers, copy each other and generally try to capture as much market share as they can. A point is eventually reached where there is very little difference between each of the operators.

While the above is true, I still subscribe to the idea that any business can continue to differentiate itself from its competitors for an unlimited period, but you have to look very closely at the business.

One of the things the team in Superquinn were very good at was identifying changes that could be made that would really benefit the consumer – like recognising that customers really wanted their vegetables to be ultra-fresh. We developed a scheme to cut and sell sensitive fresh products within 24 hours, so consumers buying lettuce, cabbage, cauliflower, etc, could be guaranteed their product was at maximum freshness. While our competitors could all have done this, none of them spotted the opportunity until after we succeeded in attracting attention with the scheme. By the time they copied us, we had moved on to the next innovation.

Another simple example was when we guaranteed all of our steaks to be 100pc tender and offered to refund any customer that felt otherwise. We caught the market completely off guard and while our competitors could have put the same schemes into place, they didn’t see the opportunity. We over-traded in beef for many decades while our competitors tried to catch up.

There are dozens of innovations to the operating model that you can make and I don’t subscribe to the idea that this process ever stops. It is always possible to keep ahead of your competitors. Keep your team energised and focused and listen to your customers

Article Source: http://tinyurl.com/kbwqb42

Small firms fear Brexit tariffs and CAP budget cuts

Tariffs, currency fluctuations and corporation tax were among the concerns raised by more than 230 small business owners and interest group representatives at a Brexit event yesterday.

The event held in Loughrea, Co Galway, and organised by Supermac’s, was addressed by RTE Europe editor Tony Connelly, and Farmers Association president Joe Healy. Among the concerns aired by those present were the implications for small businesses in the event of a hard Brexit.

One such business owner was Mícheál Quinn, owner of Quinn RV SIP, a vehicle manufacturing company employing just over 100 people in Athenry, Co Galway.

Quinn RV SIP exports as much as 70pc of its products to the UK. Mr Quinn said he feels SMEs are largely being ignored by the Government and Enterprise Ireland.

By attending the event, he hoped to get “some form of clarity” around Brexit, but added that he didn’t think he would. “It is becoming difficult to get straight answers,” he said.

The company has projects scheduled for the UK market next spring, and he told the Irish Independent that a number of key customers in the UK have contacted him for assurance that he will still take on UK-based work “which is comfort to us”. However he remains concerned about the impact of possible tariffs and currency fluctuations on this business.

Another SME owner said that while what Brexit will look like remains unknown, it was “reassuring” to be in a room full of businesses with similar concerns.

Worries were also raised around Ireland’s corporation tax rate. The 12.5pc rate has long been a point of contention among some other European nations.

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A member of the audience asked if the rate would now come under pressure at European level, given that Ireland was losing a “huge ally” in Europe once the UK leaves the EU.

“There is always pressure on Ireland to adjust our tax regime and that pressure is always resisted,” Mr Connelly said.

However, Mr Connelly added that for any change to the rate to take place, there would need to be unanimity from EU member states on the matter, and Ireland has a veto on any changes to tax rules.

Mr Healy said that some people questioned whether Ireland had allowed itself to become too dependent on the UK as an export market for food.

However he pointed to fact that when Ireland first joined what was then the EEC in 1973, 70pc of agri-exports were going to the UK. Today this figure is around 40pc.

Nonetheless, the agri-food sector is set to be disproportionately impacted by Brexit. Mr Connelly noted that within weeks of the Brexit vote taking place, five mushroom businesses in Ireland went to the wall, due in part to the impact of the fall in the value of sterling.

Ann Mitchell, a member of Galway IFA, asked whether the budget for Europe’s Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) would by affected under a no-deal scenario between the UK and the EU.

“The EU budget would be impacted and CAP would come under attack,” Mr Connelly said, adding though, that he was of the view that the Commission didn’t want a radically cut CAP budget because of Brexit – but that was under the scenario that there would be a withdrawal agreement. “I think everything will be hit if there is a hard Brexit,” he added.

Mr Healy went on to say that a fear for the IFA is that the UK, post-Brexit, pursue a “cheap food policy… importing food from places like South America”.

Mr McDonagh, CEO of Supermac’s, said that he was hosting the event because Brexit is something “we are all still learning about”.

Article Source: http://tinyurl.com/kbwqb42